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Table of Contents
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 191-192

Microbiota as a predictor of mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation


Department of Medical Oncology, Dr. B.R.A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Date of Submission10-Jan-2022
Date of Decision22-Jan-2022
Date of Acceptance23-Jan-2022
Date of Web Publication24-Feb-2022

Correspondence Address:
Ajay Gogia
Department of Medical Oncology, Dr. B.R.A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110 029
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/crst.crst_11_22

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How to cite this article:
Sharma R, Gogia A, Baa AK. Microbiota as a predictor of mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Cancer Res Stat Treat 2022;5:191-2

How to cite this URL:
Sharma R, Gogia A, Baa AK. Microbiota as a predictor of mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Cancer Res Stat Treat [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 May 21];5:191-2. Available from: https://www.crstonline.com/text.asp?2022/5/1/191/342443



Peled et al. recently reported that patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) have disruption of their microbiota characterized by loss of diversity and domination by a single taxon, and higher diversity of intestinal microbiota was found to be associated with a lower risk of death.[1] Subgroup analysis identified an association between lower intestinal diversity and higher risk of transplantation-related morbidity and mortality attributable to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).[1] The most common genera which contributed to domination events were Enterococcus and Streptococcus.[1] However, this study provides data at the genus level, and we are concerned that information at the genus level may not be a better predictor of outcomes than species level information. Stool cultures can provide information at the species level. A recently published study used stool cultures for surveillance in patients undergoing allogeneic SCT and demonstrated the prevalence of multidrug-resistant organisms along with the drug-resistance pattern and correlation with mortality and acute GVHD.[2] Stool cultures could be an alternative to provide information at the species level along with the pattern of drug resistance.

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Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Peled JU, Gomes AL, Devlin SM, Littmann ER, Taur Y, Sung AD, et al. Microbiota as predictor of mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation. N Engl J Med 2020;382:822-34.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Korula A, Perumalla S, Devasia AJ, Abubacker FN, Lakshmi KM, Abraham A, et al. Drug-resistant organisms are common in fecal surveillance cultures, predict bacteremia and correlate with poorer outcomes in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplants. Transpl Infect Dis 2020;22:e13273.  Back to cited text no. 2
    




 

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